CCMS Volume 1 (iBooks). Where The Trails Return: Cultural Influences on Hupa History. by Brian Gleeson

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CCMS Volume 1 (iBooks). Where The Trails Return: Cultural Influences on Hupa History. by Brian Gleeson

9.99

ABSTRACT:  The history of the Hupa in northwestern California after the California Gold Rush in 1848 includes many struggles and wars, of which the Treaty of 1864 was a climax.  This study uses an ethnohistorical approach to examine how culture guided Hupa responses during this era, and influenced the cause, course, and outcome of events.  The cultural themes of the homeland and legal systems of conflict resolution played a key role in Hupa strategies and actions.  The Hupa collectively countered the invasion of settlers in their homeland, and engaged in complex power struggles with the United States Government.  The focal motivation of Hupa efforts was in ensuring the continued possession of their homeland, which was executed through Hupa systems of law and conflict resolution.  The Hupa were successful in their struggle, as the Treaty of 1864 established a reservation encompassing a vast amount of their aboriginal territory, which has remained a foundation for the Hupa to this day.

99 pages. Includes bibliographic references and appendices. 23 illustrations. 4 tables. Design and layout by Brian Gleeson
ISSN 2333-9667 (electronic format) iBooks version.

iBooks app required to properly view on Apple devices (iPad, iPhone, Mac). Includes interactive features and iBooks functionality.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Brian Gleeson lives in Oakland, California and has a Master’s Degree in Anthropology from San Francisco State University.  He is the Editor in Chief of California Cultures: A Monographs Series.  He has been studying Hupa culture and history since 2001, and continues to conduct research in the region.  He is also an instructor at California State University, East Bay, in the Department of Anthropology.