CCMS Volume 5 (iBooks) Dogs in California Aboriginal Cultures. by John Ensminger

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CCMS Volume 5 (iBooks) Dogs in California Aboriginal Cultures. by John Ensminger

8.99

ABSTRACT:  Most of the tribes of California had dogs, though there was considerable variation as to whether and how they were used in hunting, what prey they might find and pursue, whether they were given training, which was most common for dogs used in driving deer and elk, whether they were never eaten, eaten occasionally in certain ceremonies, or eaten regularly as a matter of course, whether they were fed or relegated to eating refuse and waste, if and how they were sheltered, whether they were sacrificed and buried on the death of their owners, whether they received separate burials with grave goods, and whether the tribe had a breeding population of dogs or received them in trade.  Although frequently compared to wolves, coyotes and even foxes by early travelers, interbreeding with other canids was likely far less frequent than initially supposed.  Both large and small dogs are found in archeological digs and during the historical period, with some tribes having dogs of both sizes.  Two different morphotypes of small dogs are attested for some areas.  They had roles in myths, and creation stories often indicate that they and humans descended from the first beings and that they could at one time talk with and even mate with humans.  After the arrival of European cultures they began to disappear as distinct types.

California Cultures : A Monograph Series v. 5. 2017
Oakland, CA: Land of Oaks Institute.
156 Pages. Includes bibliographical references, 10 illustrations.Design and layout by Timothy Jordan & Brian Gleeson.
CCMS editors, Timothy Jordan & Brian Gleeson.
ISSN 2333-9667 (electronic format) iBooks version

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
John Ensminger is an attorney and member of the bars of the State of New York and the United States Supreme Court.  He is an expert on legal matters involving skilled dogs and their handlers, and has authored the books: Service and Therapy Dogs in American Society: Science, Law and the Evolution of Canine Caregivers, and Police and Military Dogs: Criminal Detection, Forensic Evidence, and Judicial Admissibility. He is editor of The Complete Book of Dogs, editor of and contributor to Canine Olfaction Science and Law: Advances in Forensic Science, Medicine, Conservation, and Environmental Remediation, editor of Money Laundering, Terrorism and Financial Institutions, a contributor to GPSolo Magazine, as well as a contributing editor of the Animal Legal and Historical Center of Michigan State University.   
He also reports on legal and scientific developments concerning dogs, service dogs, police dogs, and military dogs on his Dog Law Reporter blog.


CONTACT THE AUTHOR: Via email: jensminger@msn.com

Website for John Ensminger’s blog, http://doglawreporter.blogspot.com